Mount Greenwood Housing - The South Side of Chicago



The housing in Mount Greenwood continues to improve. People in Mount Greenwood continue to add full second stories and front porches, expanding the original cape cods and single story homes. 








Wrought iron fences are a nice addition.


And sometimes an older house is torn down and a bigger home is erected.
More photos at:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/YrJKwWXuNW3aafjg6


Facade Improvement Plans



Façade Improvement Programs:
Getting the Private Sector Involved in Downtown Revitalization

Authors: Craig Hullinger AICP
and
Diane Gormely-Barnes AICP

A Facade Improvement Program can be a cost effective method of encouraging private sector reinvestment in older commercial areas. A program will usually provide partial funding for appropriate facade improvements that both enhance the appearance of the building and contribute to the overall character of an historic commercial area or central business district (CBD), most often as part of a larger improvement program.

The Village of Tinley Park, Illinois undertook a transit-oriented development (TOD) plan in 1998 that was sponsored by the Regional Transportation Authority of Northeastern Illinois (RTA). The RTA’s Regional Transportation Assistance Program (RTAP) provided matching funds for the development of the plan. The TOD plan was essentially a downtown improvement plan, focusing on enhancements to the train station area within the historic commercial core of the community. The community planning process, led by the Chicago-based planning firm of Camiros, Ltd., resulted in recommendations to enhance the appearance and viability of the “Old Town” area along Oak Park Avenue, adjacent to the Metra station.


Train stations were the focus of many communities when rail transport was king. The CBD of Tinley Park developed around the train station, a stop on the famous Rock Island Line. Most businesses and homes were within easy walking distance of the train station. As the town grew and the auto became dominant, wider modern roads diverted traffic away from the historic commercial buildings adjacent to the train tracks. The station area declined in importance and became a minor center relative to the large commercial centers developed at the intersections of major roads elsewhere in Tinley Park. The Village became concerned about the deterioration of “Old Town” and also recognized that some of the buildings no longer exhibited a character appropriate for an historic area, due to modern era renovations.

The TOD plan included numerous proposed improvements to Metra facilities, and also many landscaping, streetscaping and marketing enhancements. The Village and Metra have moved aggressively to implement the public sector initiatives of the plan, and a number of improvements have been made or are underway. These include the removal of an unsightly water tower near the tracks, parking lot and sidewalk upgrades, installation of a plaza near the station to serve as a community gathering space and CBD focal point, and the ongoing construction of a new Metra station. A new mixed-use building containing retail space and condominiums is also under construction on a key site in the area.

A very important and effective part of the plan was the development of Façade Improvement Guidelines, and the preparation of several specific facade improvement concepts for high visibility buildings in the area. The Guidelines address three specific development types found in the station area: traditional commercial facades built up to the sidewalk, auto-oriented buildings set back from the street, and older residences that have been converted to business use. Each façade improvement concept included a detailed illustration of the potential future appearance of the façade, juxtaposed with a photograph of the existing condition of the building. The sketches provided an improvement recommendation that each building owner could pursue with an architect or directly with a general contractor, depending upon the scope of the proposed façade changes.

The Village of Tinley Park then developed and marketed a Façade Improvement Program for buildings in the CBD, beginning with building owners for whom the Village had proactively funded improvement concepts. Under the Program, the building owner hires an architect acceptable to the Village to design (or in these cases refine) a façade concept and estimate the cost of the improvements.  Drawings are then submitted to the Village. If approved, the Village reimburses the building owner for up to 50% of the cost of the façade improvements.

A picture is worth a thousand words. Village staff used the facade improvement concepts in meetings with property owners, the business community, and developers. The sketches were very effective in developing interest in building improvements by the private sector. Several buildings in the immediate area of the train station have been attractively renovated and house thriving restaurants that are highly visible to passing Metra commuters, providing outdoor dining areas and substantial new downtown activity, jobs, and sales tax revenue.

A Facade Improvement Program is a low cost and effective way to attract quality investment to a community. The facade improvement concepts were a very important outgrowth of the TOD plan.  They encouraged the active involvement of the private sector in area improvements. The improvements generated by the TOD plan and Facade Improvement Program jump-started a successful effort toward community revitalization.

The authors:

Craig Hullinger, AICP is a city planning consultant.  He can be reached at:
craighullinger@gmail.com



Diane Gormely-Barnes, AICP, AIA, LEED AP
is currently a Principal Planner with HNTB Corporation in Chicago, Illinois.  She was formerly a Senior Associate at Camiros, Ltd. She can be reached at dcbarnes@hntb.com.

For more information on Tinley Park’s Façade Improvement Program and other “Old Town” initiatives, contact: Director of Planning for Tinley Park, IL at 708 444 5000.
The façade improvements at Ed and Joe’s Pizzeria were also based on historic photographs.  The decorative wooden façade and signage replaced dark, diagonal wood siding that had been installed in recent decades.


Teehan’s Tavern was upgraded with ground floor storefront improvements and new siding and trim above.  A raised outdoor seating area was also added to enliven the street.



Façade improvements proposed for the Holstein’s Saloon building were based directly on photographic evidence of its historic appearance in the early 1900s.  The new façade replaced a plain brick front that had been installed over the original ornate wooden façade. A raised outdoor dining area was also created.


Darn, My Sox

 

Darn, My Sox

The dialogue below came from a discussion among our High School EMPEHI 1960's Classes Graduates Group. 

_____

My wife and I have a running debate about clothing.  I say Waste Not, Want Not, meaning wear clothing until it is worn out.  

She takes the opposite view and buys us many more clothes than we can possibly use. So we provide GoodWill and Salvation Army with boatloads of older but still serviceable clothes.

The sock is a case in point. Now I agree it is a bit shopworn. Nevertheless it can still be worn.  And it provides freedom and aeration to my feet and is much more economical than buying new socks. It is green and sustainable to wear old, slightly used socks, rather than buying new socks. My Lady Boss insists that it be thrown away.

 

DARN MY SOCKS

I pointed out to her that if she would darn my socks we could keep using them. She said something unprintable about my socks but it did not include the word Darn. More emphatic, I would say. And not very polite.

OK, she wins. Out goes the sock. A sad loss. I hope it has a good afterlife. I don’t suppose GoodWill wants it.

 

AND

When I was single I hit on the concept of always buying identical socks.  This way you never had to take the time to mate and pair them - since all my socks were the same they all worked.  Sadly my wife does not follow this simple precept and continues to buy many many socks with different designs. Finding mates for my multitude of socks is difficult if not impossible.  

 

Sartorial Excellence

I am careless with clothing.  I don't really care all that much. And wearing unmatched socks is ok, as long as they don't clash too much.  But once at a Planning Commission meeting I noticed that I was wearing unmatched shoes.  I was a bit embarrassed and tried to keep one foot mostly under the table when I rose to point out items on the map. I was a consultant to the Planning Commission. 

But then I thought it was funny and so outed myself.  The Commision members thought it was humorous but no doubt wondered why they were paying me to guide the community's long range future when I was not able to wear matching shoes.

I was of course a bad fit for the Marine Corps which is fanatical about appearance. And so they trained me to be careful about wearing the uniform.  And I did better, but my troops frequently fiddled with my medals before an important event to make sure they were correct and they were not embarrassed by me.

____________

I always wore colorful socks when my office was in the Bridgeview courthouse.  The cafeteria manager would check my socks. If colorful enough,  he bought my coffee 


Tom

____________


Those darn medals. I had all my rows of medals put on one big piece of velcro. That way if I found a big enough wall I could display them there also.


Pete

_____________


Your wife wins! Bye-bye Holy Sox!


Marie

____________


Craig, mismatched socks are the in thing now with the younger set, and I presume, the young at heart, too.  Kudos.


Will

_________

 

Who knew?  Great idea.  I will run with it. Actually, I already do that, but I did not know I was trendy.

 

I suggest this to my wife, that she wear one earring when she has lost the other, or wear unmatched earrings, but so far she has not agreed. Seems quite logical to me.


Craig

_____________


Mismatched earrings are "in", so are mismatched socks and even mismatched shoes. I've seen soccer players wearing 2 different colored shoes.  So you are really "hip" and a trendsetter, 


Marie

_____________


Good to know!  "Hip and a Trendsetter"  Cool. Although I suppose that a Hip Trendsetting 73 year old would not say "cool'.


Craig

_________


So next time I mismatch earrings, socks or shoes I will be cool!! How about if I have a shirt on inside out?    


Sandy

_____


Inside out is good,  and a well known way to wear your shirt for two days.  Or four or six or thirty six if you wish.

 

Green and sustainable. Saves energy and washing and soap and water.  

 

Actually, of course, never washing your clothes would be even more green.

 

I know someone like that, but he was in the 65 class. 

 

Reminds me of the great country and western song.

 

 

Then I fumbled through my closet for my clothes

And found my cleanest dirty shirt

It's the one I'm wearin'

 

Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down lyrics - Kris Kristofferson Click to play this song!


Well I woke up Sunday morning

With no way to hold my head, that didn't hurt

And the beer I had for breakfast

Wasn't bad so I had one more for dessert

Then I fumbled through my closet for my clothes

And found my cleanest dirty shirt

It's the one I'm wearin'

And I shaved my face and combed my hair

And stumbled down the stairs to meet the day


I'd smoked my brain the night before

Or I smoked so much the night before

With cigarettes and songs that I've been pickin'

My mouth was like an ashtray I'd been lickin'

But I lit my first and watched a small kid

Cussin' at a can that he was kicking

Then I crossed the empty street

And caught the Sunday smell of someone fryin' chicken

And it took me back to somethin'

That I'd lost somehow somewhere along the way


Chorus:

On the Sunday morning sidewalks

Wishing Lord that I was stoned

'Cause there is something in a Sunday

That makes a body feel alone

And there's nothin' short of dyin'

Half as lonesome as the sound

On the sleepin' city side walks

Sunday mornin' comin' down


In the park I saw a daddy

With a laughing little girl who he was swingin'

And I stopped beside a Sunday school

And listened to the song that they were singin'

Then I headed back for home and

Somewhere far away a lonely bell was ringin'

And it echoed thru the canyon like

The disappearing dreams of yesterday.


Chorus:

On the Sunday morning sidewalks

Wishing Lord that I was stoned

'Cause there is something in a Sunday

That makes a body feel alone

And there's nothin' short of dyin'

Half as lonesome as the sound

On the sleepin' city side walks

Sunday mornin' comin' down.


________


Sorry but I have to agree with Beth. The socks had a good run though. 😬

Sandy

________


Good advice. 


Sandy

___________


Try some Bombas. Maybe you’ll rethink your sock choices. I doubt if your socks provide an odor free environment for Beth.


Pete

__________


I did not know what Bombas meant and had to look it up.  I suppose my lack of knowledge hurts my image as a "Hip and a Trendsetter" .


Bombas is a comfort focused sock and apparel brand with a mission to help those in need. One purchased = one donated, always and forever.

Bombas.com   Bombas

Craig

_________


Let's all chip in to buy Craig a new pair of socks!!!


Pete

________


Excellent idea! I will set up the Buy Craig Sox Go Fund Me page ASAP

_______


Na, I am ok now that Will told me it was fashionable to wear unmatched socks. I have plenty of those. Thank you, Will.

_____

 

Socks v sox.  As I wrote this missive I alternately used sox and socks. My spell / grammar checker said use socks.  But some sources accept the use.

 

Why the White Sox aren’t the White Socks.

By Daniel Engber OCT 25, 2005


Why are these teams “Sox” rather than “Socks”?

 

“They followed the fashion of the times. Many early baseball teams were named after their uniform colors. In the 19th century, there were clubs called the Red Stockings, Brown Stockings, and Blue Stockings. Newspapers like the Chicago Tribune often shortened these nicknames to “Sox.” When Charlie Comiskey founded the American League’s Chicago White Stockings in 1901, the Tribune wasted no time in dubbing them the White Sox. Boston’s AL franchise seems not to have had an official name during its first few years. Reporters called them different names on different days, including the Americans (to distinguish them from Boston’s National League team), the Bostons, the Plymouth Rocks, and the Beaneaters. In late 1907, the club’s owner settled on the Red Sox.”

 

Why the love affair with the letter “x”? The formation of the modern baseball leagues coincides, more or less, with a broad movement to simplify English spelling. The father of the movement, Noah Webster, had pushed to create a “national language” a century earlier. Webster wanted to distinguish American English from British English by correcting irregular spellings and eliminating silent letters. Some of Webster’s suggestions took—”jail” for “gaol”—while others haven’t caught on—”groop” for “group.”

 

Near the turn of the century, advocacy groups like the Spelling Simplification Board pushed for spelling reform with renewed vigor; they argued that millions of dollars were wasted on printing useless letters. The editor of the Chicago Tribune, Joseph Medill, supported the idea. Medill stripped final “e”s from words like “favorite” in the pages of his newspaper and even suggested more wholesale changes that would have made written English look something like e-mail spam. In 1906, Teddy Roosevelt ordered the government printer to adopt some simplified spellings—such as replacing the suffix “-ed” with “-t” at the end of many words—for official correspondence. Congress responded by passing a bill in support of standard orthography later that year.

 

By the first decade of the 1900s, “sox” was already a common way to shorten “socks.” The “x” version of the word frequently appeared in advertisements for hosiery, for example. And in his 1921 tome The American Language, H.L. Mencken described “sox” as a “vigorous newcomer.” “The White Sox are known to all Americans; the White Socks would seem strange,” he wrote.

The spelling reform movement weakened over the course of the 20th century. But by the time “sox” fell out of fashion, the baseball nicknames were already entrenched in the sports pages and in the hearts of the teams’ fans.”

 

Click to read the full article:

 

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2005/10/why-the-white-sox-aren-t-the-white-socks.html

 

________

 

Socks v Sox, very interesting. I think it is fine to use both spellings. Interesting that other similar words would not sound correct. Most of the list below are real words, often with a different definition for “x” v “ocks”.  Some are not real words. Some of them have no meaning, or very different meanings, and some are foreign words that have worked their way into English. 

 

Box v Bocks

Lox v Locks

Cox v Cocks

Mox v Mocks

Dox v Docks

Fox v Focks

Gox v Gocks

Hox v Hocks

Jox v Jocks

Xox v Xocks

 

Probably continues through the alphabet, but I decided that this sux and will not continue.

 

    https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/what-is-lox/

Craig

_________


Just don't mix White Sox with Red Sox....


Marie


_________

Could be a problem. I am somewhat color blind, and as my wife frequently reminds me, taste blind. 

 

Which makes it easy - wear whatever you want and don't worry about it. One of the old guys that wears loud colorful goofy clothes and does not worry about it.


Craig

________


Noah Webster must be spinning in his grave the way kids have overly contracted the language in texts and such.  Like paw brb for parents are watching.  Be right back.

 

The military and Mensa organizations use acronyms to speed communication.  Probably others, too.  Newcomers learn to quickly adapt, but most commercial operations don't want to make prospective customers uncomfortable, so stick to longhand.


Will

_________


I spend WAY too much time searching acronyms on google. Sometimes your (not you personally) shortcut adds minutes to my trying to figure what your cryptic initials mean. Not a good time spender.


Tom

________


I worked once with a golf pro who always dressed to the nines. A mutual friend imparted that Ken was severely colorblind. His wife sewed threads into every article of clothing 1 thread went with 1 thread, 2 with 2, etc. He never failed to dress appropriately.


Tom

________


Color blind story - in the early years of my marriage, being "starving students", I would darn holes in my husband's socks.  One day, he purchased the thread to be used to darn his socks.  I protested to him that he had purchased brown thread and his socks were black.  He said as he couldn't see the difference in color and the holes were on the bottom of his socks, it didn't matter to him what color the thread was.  So, darn his socks I did.  His parents came to visit.  While sitting and visiting, he took off his shoes and put his feet up.  His mother shrieked, "Don't move!.  You have chocolate on the bottom of your socks."  We all had a good chuckle when I explained it was merely the darning of the holes with brown thread.  Haven't darned socks in many, many years.

 

Pam 

_________

 

Great story🤣🤣

 

Marie

________

 

One day in traffic behind a really blah-colored car, I commented to my wife, "why would anyone buy that color car?"  She replied, maybe they are color blind, so they all look the same to them and that color was less expensive.  It was one of those "Duh-moments" for me, as she was right of course.  I no longer criticize color choices any more.

 

Will

_________

 

Great story. My first husband, a well off college professor, expected me to darn his socks. Guess who lost that one?

 

Sandy

________

 

Allen sent an email on this subject, but it had no text in the email.

 

 

We must have knocked his sox off.

 

Craig